Tag Allergen

High pollen count wreaking havoc on seasonal allergy sufferers | Local – KY3.com

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Worst Allergy Season in Recent Times?

Seasonal allergies are especially bad this year because there’s more overlap among trees, flowers and grasses as far as their blooming time this year than in normal years, and this is taking a toll on allergy sufferers.

“I don’t normally have any allergies really and then this year it just suddenly came to me,” says Carol Quinn.

Carol has noticed her allergies acting up more this year than in years past.

“I’ve had watery eyes, itchy eyes, sneezing, coughing,” says Quinn.

But she’s not the only one; experts say conditions are right this year to make allergies bad on everyone.

To read more, click on the link below.

High pollen count wreaking havoc on seasonal allergy sufferers | Local – KY3.com.

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Stocking Epinephrine in Schools Might Save Lives | HealthDay News

As a pediatrician at Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus, Ohio, Dr. Sarah Denny has seen her share of the life-threatening reactions that can happen with food allergies.

That didn’t make it any less scary when her son Liam, then 18 months old, drank soy milk and was soon covered in hives and having trouble breathing. Moments later, he was unconscious.

She called 911 while her husband jabbed their son in the thigh with an epinephrine pen. “I could hear sirens on the way to us,” Denny recalled. “I’m holding Liam out on the curb, and my medical brain kicked in. I thought, ‘I need to be doing chest compressions.’ ”

She didn’t have to — the epinephrine quickly took effect. On the way to the hospital, her son woke up. Fifteen minutes later he was smiling and talking again.

“Epinephrine works very quickly. As long as you give it soon enough, it can reverse a [severe] reaction,” Denny said. “It’s truly lifesaving. Had we waited to give it or just called 911, I’m not sure he would have survived.”

To help ensure children like Liam can get epinephrine when it’s needed, new federal legislation encourages schools to have epinephrine for any child who needs it. Signed into law by President Barack Obama last November, the School Access to Emergency Epinephrine Act gives states a financial incentive for passing legislation requiring that schools have epinephrine on hand and personnel trained in how to use it. Obama’s daughter Malia has a peanut allergy.

“Epinephrine needs to be given right away, within five minutes of the onset of symptoms,” said Dr. David Stukus, an allergist and immunologist at Nationwide Children’s Hospital. “If you wait longer, the risk for death increases.”

…But about one in four first-time food-allergy reactions happens at school, and the parents might not even realize their child is allergic. Denny kept an EpiPen at home because she knew Liam was allergic to dairy, eggs, peanuts and tree nuts. But he had eaten soy before with no issues.

…Currently, 26 states permit schools to stock epinephrine for use in any child who needs it. Only five states — Maryland, Michigan, Nebraska, Nevada and Virginia — require schools to stock epinephrine, according to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America.

That leaves 19 states that have no such legislation.

The federal legislation gives states that require schools to stock epinephrine preference for receiving asthma education grants. Also, state and federal legislation empowers school personnel to take action to save a life.

“We would like to see state legislatures require [schools to stock epinephrine],” said John Lehr, CEO of Food Allergy Research & Education. “We understand that each state and locality needs to make its own budgeting decisions, but we believe that having stock epinephrine in the schools will save lives.”

“All of the [epinephrine pens] are easy to learn to use and safe, even if accidentally given to someone without a food allergy or [someone who is] not having a food-allergy reaction,” Stukus said. “It’s adrenaline, which we all have in our bodies.”

To read more, please click on this link Stocking Epinephrine in Schools Might Save Lives.

Please call your school to make sure epipen is stocked.

Tips for Tackling Winter Allergy Triggers

Tips for Tackling Winter Allergy Triggers.

Miller and Reisacher offered the following tips to help allergy sufferers through the winter:

  1. Turn on the exhaust fan when showering or cooking to remove excess humidity and odors from your home, and clean your carpets with a HEPA vacuum to decrease dust mites and pet allergen levels. Mopping your floors is also a good idea.
  2. Wash your hands often, especially after playing with pets and when coming home from public places.
  3. Wash your bed linens and pajamas in hot water (above 130 degrees) to kill dust mites.
  4. Consider your bedroom the allergy “safe haven” of your home. Keep pets, carpets, rugs and plants out of your bedroom to avoid dust mites and mold from decaying plants. It is a good idea to place an allergenic barrier around your pillows and mattress to create a barrier between dust mites and your nose.
  5. Before putting up your Christmas tree, spray it with a garden hose and remove all dust from your holiday decorations.
  6. Install high-efficiency furnace filters. They capture 30 times more allergens. Also make sure your furnace fan is always on.
  7. Keep your indoor humidity level between 30 percent and 40 percent — using a humidifier or dehumidifier — to prevent mold growth. Change humidifier water and filters according to manufacturer recommendations to avoid mold and bacteria contamination.
  8. Survey your house indoors and outdoors monthly to look for visible mold, and identify areas that are at high risk for mold formation. Examples include a pile of firewood close to the house or an area of the basement with a musty smell.

To read more, please click on the link above.

14 Tips for a Dust-free Bedroom; Sleep Deeper, Breathe Easier

new-treatment-for-people-with-allergies-to-grass-and-dust-mites

As the weather cools off, we spend more and more time indoors, which makes indoor allergy symptoms worse.  Here, are my tips to help you minimize dust mite exposure and hence allergy symptoms.

1. Empty and clean all closets and, if possible, store contents elsewhere and seal closets. If this is not possible, keep clothing in zippered plastic bags and shoes in boxes off the floor.

2. Remove carpeting, if possible.

3. Clean and scrub the woodwork and floors thoroughly to remove all traces of dust. Wipe wood, tile, or linoleum floors with water, wax, or oil. If you use linoleum, cement it to the floor.

4. Wear a filter mask when cleaning.

5. Clean the room thoroughly and completely once a week.  Clean floors, furniture, tops of doors, window frames and sills, etc., with a damp cloth or oil mop. Carefully vacuum carpet and upholstery regularly. Use a special filter in the vacuum.

6. Wash curtains often at 130 degrees Fahrenheit.

7. Carpeting makes dust control impossible. Although shag carpets are the worst type for the dust-sensitive person, all carpets trap dust. Therefore, health care experts recommend hardwood, tile, or linoleum floors.

Treating carpets with tannic acid eliminates some dust mite allergen. Tannic acid, however, is Not as effective as removing the carpet from the room.

8. Encase box springs and mattress in a zippered dust-proof or allergen-proof cover.
Scrub bed springs outside the room.

9. Use only washable materials on the bed. Sheets, blankets, and other bedclothes should be washed frequently in water that is at least 130 degrees Fahrenheit. Lower temperatures will not kill dust mites. Use a synthetic, such as dacron, mattress pad and pillow.

10. Avoid fuzzy wool blankets or feather- or wool-stuffed comforters and mattress pads.

11. Keep furniture and furnishings to a minimum.  Avoid upholstered furniture and blinds.  Use only a wooden or metal chair that can be scrubbed. Use only plain, lightweight curtains on the windows.

12. Electrostatic and high-efficiency particulate absorption (HEPA) filters can effectively remove many allergens from the air. If functioning improperly, however, electrostatic filters may emit ozone, which can be harmful to your lungs if you have asthma.

13. A dehumidifier may help because house mites need high humidity to live and grow. You should take special care to clean the unit frequently with a weak bleach solution (1 cup bleach in 1 gallon water) or a commercial product to prevent mold growth. Although low humidity may reduce dust mite levels, it might irritate your nose and lungs.

14. Keep toys that will accumulate dust out of the child’s bedroom. Avoid stuffed toys.  Use only washable toys of wood, rubber, metal, or plastic. Store toys in a closed toy box or chest.

Although these steps may seem difficult at first, experience plus habit will make them easier. The results-better breathing, fewer medicines, and greater freedom from allergy and asthma attacks-will be well worth the effort.

Sleep Well, Breathe Well.