Tag allergy

High-Fiber Diet May Help Prevent Allergies | LiveScience.com

Several new studies suggest that dietary fiber could play a role in food allergies.

This notion is based on the idea that bacteria in the gut have the enzymes needed to digest dietary fiber, and when these bacteria break down fiber, they produce substances that help to prevent an allergic response to foods, said Charles Mackay, an immunologist at Monash University in Melbourne, Australia.

So far, the research related to this idea has been done mainly in mice, and dietary factors are unlikely to be the sole explanation for why allergy rates have skyrocketed, researchers say. But if the results were to be replicated in human studies, they would suggest that promoting the growth of good gut bacteria could be one way to protect against, and possibly even reverse, certain allergies, researchers say.

To read more, click on High-Fiber Diet May Help Prevent Allergies.

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Fall allergy survival guide | Fox News

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Fall allergy survival guide | Fox News.

Here are some simple and practical allergy tips to help you start fighting fall allergies:

Wear oversized sunglasses to block airborne pollens and molds from entering your eyes and lids that will cause redness and watery eyes.

Go for a wide-brimmed hat and avoid hair gels that turn your ‘do into a pollen magnet!

Even during mid-Fall, avoid line drying clothing— particularly bed linens— on a high-pollen day outdoors.

Pollen levels are highest on windy, dry and sunny days.  Check your local weather reports to identify high allergy days.

Simple in-office allergy tests can pinpoint your problem.

Many medications will work better (nasal antihistamines/steroids, oral antihistamines and eye drops) if you start them even before symptoms begin.

Allergy injections (shots) and/or sublingual allergy treatment are the only immune-based therapy we have that will help to reduce allergy symptoms. The goal is to provide excellent long-term relief, in a large majority of allergy sufferers.

Shampoo and shower nightly to rinse the pollens from your skin and hair. Change your clothing before entering your bedroom to prevent pollens from being brought into your bedroom.

Gently irrigate your eyelids (while your eyes are closed) with a mild, tear-free “baby” shampoo to remove excess allergens and pollutants that may have accumulated.

The sites in the home that are mostly likely to harbor molds include the bathroom— especially on the tile and under the sink— basement areas and damp carpeting.

It’s important to wash any fall or winter clothing that has been in storage where dust and molds may have accumulated on them. Wash them thoroughly before wearing them.

Click on the above link, to read more.

How to Tell if It is a Cold or an Allergy

When you start with a cough, runny nose, fever, or a sore throat, you always wonder if it is called or the allergies. Here, is a helpful picture from the National Institute of Health.

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Always consult your healthcare provider.

Sleep Well, Breathe Well.

Allergies, fatigue take Aksel Lund Svindal out of Sochi Olympics | OlympicTalk

Allergies, fatigue take Aksel Lund Svindal out of Sochi Olympics | OlympicTalk.

Norwegian Alpine skiing star Aksel Lund Svindal has pulled out from the remainder of the Sochi Olympics due to allergies and fatigue according to Team Norway coach Havard Tjorhom.

Tjorhom told the Associated Press that Svindal, a three-time medalist at Vancouver four years ago, had reached “the point of no return” and so, he will not race in the men’s giant slalom on Wednesday.

To read more, please click on the link above.

Stocking Epinephrine in Schools Might Save Lives | HealthDay News

As a pediatrician at Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus, Ohio, Dr. Sarah Denny has seen her share of the life-threatening reactions that can happen with food allergies.

That didn’t make it any less scary when her son Liam, then 18 months old, drank soy milk and was soon covered in hives and having trouble breathing. Moments later, he was unconscious.

She called 911 while her husband jabbed their son in the thigh with an epinephrine pen. “I could hear sirens on the way to us,” Denny recalled. “I’m holding Liam out on the curb, and my medical brain kicked in. I thought, ‘I need to be doing chest compressions.’ ”

She didn’t have to — the epinephrine quickly took effect. On the way to the hospital, her son woke up. Fifteen minutes later he was smiling and talking again.

“Epinephrine works very quickly. As long as you give it soon enough, it can reverse a [severe] reaction,” Denny said. “It’s truly lifesaving. Had we waited to give it or just called 911, I’m not sure he would have survived.”

To help ensure children like Liam can get epinephrine when it’s needed, new federal legislation encourages schools to have epinephrine for any child who needs it. Signed into law by President Barack Obama last November, the School Access to Emergency Epinephrine Act gives states a financial incentive for passing legislation requiring that schools have epinephrine on hand and personnel trained in how to use it. Obama’s daughter Malia has a peanut allergy.

“Epinephrine needs to be given right away, within five minutes of the onset of symptoms,” said Dr. David Stukus, an allergist and immunologist at Nationwide Children’s Hospital. “If you wait longer, the risk for death increases.”

…But about one in four first-time food-allergy reactions happens at school, and the parents might not even realize their child is allergic. Denny kept an EpiPen at home because she knew Liam was allergic to dairy, eggs, peanuts and tree nuts. But he had eaten soy before with no issues.

…Currently, 26 states permit schools to stock epinephrine for use in any child who needs it. Only five states — Maryland, Michigan, Nebraska, Nevada and Virginia — require schools to stock epinephrine, according to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America.

That leaves 19 states that have no such legislation.

The federal legislation gives states that require schools to stock epinephrine preference for receiving asthma education grants. Also, state and federal legislation empowers school personnel to take action to save a life.

“We would like to see state legislatures require [schools to stock epinephrine],” said John Lehr, CEO of Food Allergy Research & Education. “We understand that each state and locality needs to make its own budgeting decisions, but we believe that having stock epinephrine in the schools will save lives.”

“All of the [epinephrine pens] are easy to learn to use and safe, even if accidentally given to someone without a food allergy or [someone who is] not having a food-allergy reaction,” Stukus said. “It’s adrenaline, which we all have in our bodies.”

To read more, please click on this link Stocking Epinephrine in Schools Might Save Lives.

Please call your school to make sure epipen is stocked.

Planning an Allergy-Friendly Birthday Party (usnews.com)

Planning an Allergy-Friendly Birthday Party – (usnews.com).

Here are some tips I garnered for when you find yourself in a similar situation:

• Inquire about dietary restrictions when sending out the invitation: To give yourself plenty of time to figure out the menu and arrange for special accommodations if needed, it’s best to ask guests about any dietary restrictions well in advance.

 

• Make a pizza plan B: Pizza is a fairly typical menu staple at kids’ parties, but it’s problematic for guests with dairy or wheat allergies, Celiac disease or who follow vegan diets.

If you’re hosting a party at home, it’s easy enough to pick up an allergy-friendly frozen pizza to offer – look for gluten-free options from Udi’s or gluten-free/dairy-free options from Amy’s Kitchen.

 

• Enlist help from parents of guests with food allergies: If you’re concerned about being able to accommodate the dietary needs of a guest with food allergies, don’t hesitate to reach out to his or her parents to ask questions or request help in ensuring appropriate options are available.

• Emphasize fun over food: While food is expected at a birthday party, the folks at Food Allergy Research & Education (FARE) suggest that it need not be the focal point of everything from goody bags to classroom celebrations.

Click on the link above to read more.

 

Winter More Brutal for Asthma and Allergy Sufferers

Winter More Brutal for Asthma and Allergy Sufferers.

As the winter months drag on, cabin fever sets in for many people. However, being cooped up inside is even harder for people suffering from asthma and allergies because more time indoors means greater exposure to indoor allergens. Although mold, pet dander and dust mites are often blamed for sneezing and itchy eyes this time of year, the National Pest Management Association (NPMA) warns that winter pests such as cockroaches and rodents can also be common asthma and allergy triggers.

To read more, click on the link above.

A Beautiful Morning at the Clinic

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Pristine snow, colorful skies, and a magnificent moon over the Clinic. Happy Wednesday, friends.

Tips for Tackling Winter Allergy Triggers

Tips for Tackling Winter Allergy Triggers.

Miller and Reisacher offered the following tips to help allergy sufferers through the winter:

  1. Turn on the exhaust fan when showering or cooking to remove excess humidity and odors from your home, and clean your carpets with a HEPA vacuum to decrease dust mites and pet allergen levels. Mopping your floors is also a good idea.
  2. Wash your hands often, especially after playing with pets and when coming home from public places.
  3. Wash your bed linens and pajamas in hot water (above 130 degrees) to kill dust mites.
  4. Consider your bedroom the allergy “safe haven” of your home. Keep pets, carpets, rugs and plants out of your bedroom to avoid dust mites and mold from decaying plants. It is a good idea to place an allergenic barrier around your pillows and mattress to create a barrier between dust mites and your nose.
  5. Before putting up your Christmas tree, spray it with a garden hose and remove all dust from your holiday decorations.
  6. Install high-efficiency furnace filters. They capture 30 times more allergens. Also make sure your furnace fan is always on.
  7. Keep your indoor humidity level between 30 percent and 40 percent — using a humidifier or dehumidifier — to prevent mold growth. Change humidifier water and filters according to manufacturer recommendations to avoid mold and bacteria contamination.
  8. Survey your house indoors and outdoors monthly to look for visible mold, and identify areas that are at high risk for mold formation. Examples include a pile of firewood close to the house or an area of the basement with a musty smell.

To read more, please click on the link above.

Hungry Middle Schoolers Create Prize-Winning Allergy App – ABC News

Hungry Middle Schoolers Create Prize-Winning Allergy App – ABC News.

When 13-year-old Samantha Hinton is unsure of the ingredients in a snack, she just doesn’t eat it.

That’s because Samantha is among the growing population of food allergy sufferers in the United States, and she fears a bite containing peanuts could kill her.

“I know it’s deadly,” she told ABC News. “And the side effects are just too scary.”

But a team of eighth-graders at her New Hampshire school created a smartphone app that could make navigating the cafeteria a whole lot easier. The Hampstead Academy students took home the grand prize at Verizon’s App Challenge with their idea for “Chow Checker,” an app that identifies food allergens.

To read more, click on the above link.